Five Individuals Indicted for Defrauding Non-Profit Medical Organization

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PITTSBURGH, PA — Five individuals, residents of Pennsylvania and Ohio, were indicted Thursday by a federal grand jury in Pittsburgh in an indictment that variously charges them with Conspiracy to Commit Mail/Wire Fraud, Wire Fraud, Conspiracy to Commit Money Laundering, and Mail Fraud, announced Acting United States Attorney Troy Rivetti.

The 17-count Indictment named Drew Pierce, age 55, of West Middlesex, PA, Mark Marriott, age 56, of Sharpsville, PA, John Laeng, age 70, of West Middlesex, PA, John O’Brien, age 60, of Masury, OH, and Christopher O’Brien, age 58, of Masury OH, as the defendants.

According to the Indictment, from 2011 through 2019, the defendants combined to defraud Primary Health Network, a non-profit medical organization, of more than $2,000,000 through a series of schemes. Not every defendant is charged with participating in each of the schemes to defraud.

“Defrauding a non-profit medical organization not only harms that organization, but it also does great indirect harm to the patients these organizations are created to help,” said Acting United States Attorney Troy Rivetti. “Through the great investigative work of and partnership with our law enforcement partners, the U. S. Attorney’s Office is able to prosecute these matters to hold perpetrators of such crimes accountable.”

“The FBI takes our responsibility to investigate and pursue those who commit fraud for personal gain very seriously,” said FBI Pittsburgh Special Agent in Charge Mike Nordwall. “Today’s indictment describes elaborate and egregious schemes to steal money from a non-profit organization. These arrests send the message that the FBI is committed to working with our partners to hold those accountable who think they can get rich through fraudulent means.”

“Engaging in a scheme to defraud a non-profit medical organization is a crime that needs to be punished,” said Yury Kruty, Special Agent in Charge of IRS-Criminal Investigation. “Today’s indictment shows that IRS-CI is committed to working with our law enforcement partners to investigate and prosecute those who commit offenses such as these.”

On each of the mail fraud, wire fraud, and conspiracy to commit mail/wire fraud counts, the law provides for a maximum total sentence of not more than 20 years in prison, and a fine of not more than $250,000 or no more than twice the gross gain to any person or loss to any person other than the defendant, whichever is greater. On each of the charges of conspiracy to commit money laundering, the law provides for a maximum total sentence of not more than 10 years in prison, and a fine of not more than $250,000 or no more than twice the gross gain to any person or loss to any person other than the defendant, or no more than twice the amount of the criminally derived property involved in the charged transactions, whichever is greatest. Under the Federal Sentencing Guidelines, the actual sentence imposed would be based upon the seriousness of the offense and the prior criminal history, if any, of the defendant.

Assistant United States Attorneys William B. Guappone and Jeffrey R. Bengel are prosecuting this case on behalf of the government.

The Federal Bureau of Investigation and the Internal Revenue Service conducted the investigation leading to the Indictment in this case.

An indictment is an accusation. A defendant is presumed innocent unless and until proven guilty.

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