September 14 Coronavirus Update: 6,261 Cases with 356 Deaths in Chester County from COVID-19

State Public Health Laboratory in Exton Tests for COVID-19State Public Health Laboratory in Exton Tests for COVID-19; Pennsylvania Commonwealth microbiologists Karen Zimmerman, prepares a master mix for PCR inside the extraction lab at the Pennsylvania Department of Health Bureau of Laboratories.

CHESTER COUNTY, PA — The Pennsylvania National Electronic Disease Surveillance System (PA-NEDSS) today confirmed 112 additional positive cases of COVID-19 in Chester County over the weekend, bringing the countywide total to 6,261 which includes 255 cases defined as probable and 356 deaths. Of these, an estimated 5,134 patients can be considered recovered. All active cases are either in isolation at home or being treated at the hospital.

In personal care facilities and personal care homes, there are 913 resident cases of COVID-19 and 299 cases among employees at 46 of 75 distinct facilities in Chester County. Out of the total deaths from COVID-19 in the county, 289 have occurred in residents from long term care facilities or personal care facilities.

There have been a total of 72,869 Chester County residents who tested negative for the COVID-19 virus to date.

For an updated map with the number of cases in Chester County by municipality, visit here. A mobile-friendly version of this information can be found here.

Coronavirus (COVID-19) in Neighboring Counties

The health data below lists the confirmed cases in neighboring counties:

  • Berks County, Pennsylvania – Cases: 6,587 | Deaths: 386
  • Montgomery County, Pennsylvania – Cases: 11,657 | Deaths: 868
  • Delaware County, Pennsylvania – Cases:  10,922 | Deaths: 742
  • New Castle County, Delaware(1) – Cases: 9,092 | Deaths: 305
  • Cecil County, Maryland(2) – Cases: 918 | Deaths: 30
  • Lancaster County, Pennsylvania – Cases: 7,325 | Deaths: 447

Statewide Coronavirus (COVID-19) Cases

Additionally, the Pennsylvania Department of Health officially confirmed the statewide total has reached 145,063, as of September 14, with a total of 7,869 deaths. Of the patients who have tested positive, 82 percent are considered recovered.

Beginning August 29, the department began publishing COVID-19 case counts using the updated standardized case definition for COVID-19 from the Council of State and Territorial Epidemiologists. This revised case definition updates criteria for case identification and case classification based on the continued evolution of the COVID-19 pandemic. It updates probable case classifications and adds suspect case classifications. The definition for confirmed cases using a positive PCR test has not changed. Viral antigen tests, which identify people who are likely currently infected, will now be considered a probable case, even if the individual has no symptoms or exposure history. Persons with a positive antibody (serology) test, moving forward, will no longer be considered a probable case. However, cases previously counted as probable cases, using the prior national case definition, will remain counted as probable cases.

READ:  Pennsylvania Provides COVID-19 Early Warning Monitoring Update for Sept. 18-24

Statewide, there is a total of 1,684,609 patients who tested negative for the COVID-19 virus to date. There are 144 cases who have a positive viral antigen test and are considered probable cases and 646 patients who have a positive serology test and either COVID-19 symptoms or a high-risk exposure.

Mask wearing is required in all businesses and whenever leaving home. Consistent mask-wearing is critical to preventing the spread of COVID-19.

Of the patients who have tested positive, based on statewide numbers, the age breakdown is as follows:(3)

  • Approximately 1% are ages 0-4;
  • Nearly 2% are ages 5-12;
  • Approximately 4% are ages 13-18;
  • Nearly 12% are ages 19-24;
  • Nearly 37% are ages 25-49;
  • Approximately 22% are ages 50-64; and
  • Approximately 22% are ages 65 or older.

Most of the patients hospitalized are aged 65 or older, and most of the deaths have occurred in patients 65 or older. More statewide data is available here.

The department is seeing significant increases in the number of COVID-19 cases among younger age groups, particularly 19 to 24-year-olds. An alert was sent to healthcare providers about the changing COVID-19 case demographics, as there are more cases in younger age groups than in those 50-64 and 65+. The following regions saw significant increases among 19 to 24-year-olds in each month from April to date in September:

  • NC – Approximately 7 percent of cases in April to nearly 69 percent of cases so far in September;
  • NE – 6 percent of cases in April to 40 percent of cases so far in September;
  • SE – Nearly 5 percent of cases in April to nearly 33 percent of cases so far in September;
  • SW – Approximately 5 percent of cases in April to nearly 30 percent of cases so far in September;
  • NW – Nearly 7 percent of cases in April to nearly 20 percent of cases so far in September; and
  • SC – Approximately 7 percent of cases in April to nearly 18 percent of cases so far in September.
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In nursing and personal care homes, there are 21,934 resident cases of COVID-19, and 4,770 cases among employees, for a total of 26,704 at 953 distinct facilities.

Out of Pennsylvania’s total deaths, 5,297 have occurred in residents from nursing or personal care facilities. Data for specific long-term care facilities in Pennsylvania, including Department of Health and Department of Human Services regulated facilities, is available here and here.

Approximately 10,117 of the total statewide cases are in health care workers.

Currently, all Pennsylvania counties are in the green phase of reopening.

For the newest information on the local, state, federal response to COVID-19, click here.

Health officials stress the role every person plays in helping to reduce the spread of COVID-19:

  • Wash your hands with soap and water for at least 20 seconds or use hand sanitizer if soap and water are not available.
  • Cover any coughs or sneezes with your elbow, not your hands.
  • Clean surfaces frequently.
  • Stay home to avoid spreading COVID-19, especially if you are unwell.
  • If you must go out, you are required to wear a mask when in a business or where it is difficult to maintain proper social distancing.
READ:  September 25 Coronavirus Update: 34 New Positives Brings Total to 6,735 COVID-19 Cases in Chester County

For an updated map with the number of statewide cases by county, visit here. For more information on COVID-19 in Chester County, visit www.Chesco.org/Coronavirus.


Editor’s Note: Initially, MyChesCo pulled county-specific COVID-19 data from the Chester County Health Department’s COVID-19 Dashboard. However, over time, that data became inconsistent and unreliable. Therefore, going forward, except where noted, MyChesCo will be using data from the Pennsylvania National Electronic Disease Surveillance System (PA-NEDSS) as the primary data source for our daily updates. Unfortunately, this means we will no longer publish a breakdown by municipality. We apologize for any inconvenience. All data is provisional and subject to change as new information becomes available.

(1) Provided by the Delaware Health Department based on the most recently available information. Data is provisional and subject to change as new information becomes available.
(2) Provided by the Maryland Department of Health based on the most recently available information. All data are preliminary and are subject to change based on additional reporting.
(3) Percentages may not total 100% due to rounding.

Thanks for visiting! MyChesCo brings reliable information and resources to Chester County, Pennsylvania. Please consider supporting us in our efforts. Your generous donation will help us continue this work and keep it free of charge. Show your support today by clicking here and becoming a patron.

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