Malvern-based Accessible Archives Releases The National Standard: A Women’s Suffrage and Temperance Journal

Malvern-based Accessible Archives Releases The National Standard: A Women's Suffrage and Temperance Journal

MALVERN, PA — Accessible Archives, Inc., a digital publisher of full-text primary source historical collections based in Malvern, Pennsylvania, announced the release of Part VI: The National Standard: A Women’s Suffrage and Temperance Journal to its Women’s Suffrage Collection.

The National Standard: A Women’s Suffrage and Temperance Journal evolved from three publishing efforts by Aaron M. Powell and Lydia M. Child, publishers and chief editors, and exploded onto the popular stage in 1870, supporting two of the major social movements in the late 19th Century – the Women’s Suffrage Movement and the Temperance Movement. This publication provided an outlet and forum for women’s viewpoints on social and political reform, literary culture, and highlighted efforts to ban the scourge of alcohol.

The National Standard: A Women’s Suffrage and Temperance Journal comprises the complete run of three related publications – The Standard, The National Standard: An Independent Reform and Literary Journal, and The National Standard: A Temperance and Literary Journal.

Beginning in May 1870, The Standard, a monthly periodical, was launched and ran through July 1870 focusing on social and political reform. After July 1870, The Standard underwent a name change, returned to its original newspaper format, and focused primarily on women’s political rights and suffrage, in addition to general social and economic reforms. This new publication, entitled The National Standard: An Independent Reform and Literary Journal, ran from July 30, 1870 to December 23, 1871.

The final editorial focus and name change came in January 1872, when chief editor Aaron M. Powell, and contributors such as Wendell Phillips expanded the focus of The National Standard to support the burgeoning temperance movement and the increasing drive towards women’s suffrage. The National Standard: A Temperance and Literary Journal ran from January to December in 1872.

From its lead article in the first edition by Lydia M. Child, famous abolitionist & women’s rights activist, these publications set out to rally its readers to the causes of women’s political rights and suffrage, social and economic reforms, and support for the burgeoning temperance movement.

The National Standard: A Women’s Suffrage and Temperance Journal joins Accessible Archives’ line-up of Women’s Suffrage Collection titles:

  • Part I: The Lily. 1849-1856
  • Part II: National Citizen and Ballot Box. 1878-1881
  • Part III: The Revolution. 1868-1872
  • Part IV: The New Citizen. 1909-1912; The Western Woman Voter. 1911-1913
  • Part V: The Remonstrance. 1890-1913

Source: Accessible Archives, 697 Sugartown Rd, Malvern PA 19355

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