Tips for Stroke Recovery: How to Get Back on Your Feet After a Stroke

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A stroke can be a frightening and life-altering event. Many stroke survivors feel like they are starting over from scratch, having to learn how to do everything all over again. However, with the right rehabilitation and support, most people make a full or near-full recovery. In this article, we will discuss some tips for stroke recovery that can help you get back on your feet as soon as possible!

Tips for Living and Recovering After a Stroke

According to the American Stroke Association, 800 thousand people in America have a stroke. That’s about 1 out of 4 adults over the age of 25 who will experience this terrible illness at some point during their life!

The rehabilitation and support a survivor receives can greatly influence health outcomes and recovery. It’s important to speak with your health care provider about physical changes. Customized rehabilitation can help restore function and teach new ways to complete everyday tasks. Stroke survivors can help reduce their risk of having another stroke by working with their health care team. Caregivers and other loved ones can provide important long-term support during your recovery and rehabilitation.

Here are some tips for living and recovering after a stroke:

1. Rehabilitation and support are key – The rehabilitation and support a survivor receives can greatly influence health outcomes and recovery according to the American Stroke Association. It’s important to seek out long-term support if possible to help with your recovery. Seek professional help if you feel like you’re struggling emotionally or mentally after having a stroke.

2. Understand physical changes – Understand that you may experience physical changes after having a stroke such as weakness on one side of your body or problems with balance, coordination, vision, or speaking, according to the Mayo Clinic. Work with your health care team so that you understand what physical changes to expect and how to manage them, according to the National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke.

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3. Get customized rehabilitation – Customized rehabilitation can help restore function and teach new ways to complete everyday tasks according to the National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke. Listening to music, playing games, or reading may also help your brain recover from a stroke according to the Mayo Clinic. Your rehab should be tailored specifically for you because each person’s situation is different according to the National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke.

4. Reduce risk of another stroke – Survivors can play an active role in reducing their risk of having another stroke by working with their health care team according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC). This includes managing underlying conditions such as heart disease, diabetes, high blood pressure, high cholesterol, or atrial fibrillation. You should also quit smoking or using tobacco products because smoking increases your risk of having another stroke as well as other complications after a stroke such as pneumonia according to the CDC. Eating healthy foods, maintaining a healthy weight, and exercising most days of the week can also help reduce your risk of having another stroke according to the CDC.

5. Have long-term support – Caregivers provide important long-term support for survivors during their recovery process but it’s important for survivors to have other forms of support as well such as friends or family members, according to National Institute on Disability Independent Living, and Rehabilitation Research (NIDILRR). Being around other people who have had strokes can be beneficial because they understand what you’re going through, according to NIDILRR. Joining a support group can also offer valuable information, resources, and emotional support after having a stroke.

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A diagnosis of stroke is life-changing not just for the person who experienced the event but also for caregivers, families, friends, and others in their social circle. Making significant lifestyle changes may be required for both survivors and those close to them. However, many resources are available to guide survivors through their journey including rehabilitation services, support groups, educational materials, and more.

Stroke Survivors: Get Support and Advice

After a stroke, it is important to find resources for rehab and recovery. The “Life After Stroke” guide can help you understand what to expect and plan for your recovery. The “Simply Good” cookbook provides healthy and easy-to-make recipes that are tailored for people with swallowing difficulties. Stroke.org also has a support network that connects stroke survivors so you can share your experiences and learn from others who are going through the same thing. With these resources, you can start on the path to recovery and Stroke.org/Recovery will be there to support you every step of the way.

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This article is intended for informational, entertainment or educational purposes only and should not be construed as advice, guidance or counsel. It is provided without warranty of any kind.